PARROTIA......
last updated 31/10/2014


Parrotia persica - the first colour of autumn.


Parrotia

Stunning autumn colour - one of the best, even on chalk. The wood of Parrotia is so hard that it acquired the common name of "Ironwood". It forms a small tree of eventually wide habit, showing distinct layers when young. The flowers consist of clusters of crimson stamens in late winter, which look absolutely beautiful with the low winter sun on them. However, it is the fabulous autumn colour for which it is renowned.

We grow a number of named forms which have been selected in different places at different times either for specific growth habits, or for even more spectacular colour than normal.

Although related to Hamamelis, they do not need acid soil. They do surprisingly well on our heavy clay. If your soil is chalky, incorporate lots of organic matter to prevent them drying out in summer.

All start at 35.00 for 2 year olds.

Specimens are available of most of them for instant gratification. 
Please ask for size and price details.

PARROTIA persica 
Stunning autumn colour - one of the best, even on chalk. The wood of Parrotia is so hard that back in Medieval times it acquired the common name of "Ironwood". It forms a large shrub or small tree of very wide habit, showing distinct layers when young. The flowers consist of clusters of crimson stamens in late winter. However, it is the autumn colour for which it is renowned.

NEW

PARROTIA persica 'Belle'

PARROTIA persica 'Biltmore' 
A wonderful clone derived from a plant in the Biltmore Gardens which is over 100 
years old. It has a rounded habit and is low branching. The purple autumn colour is exceptional and the exfoliating winter bark enhances its winter interest.

PARROTIA persica 'Burgundy'    
Our own selection of this wonderful tree. The young growth is distinctly flushed purple and the autumn colour is even better than normal!


PARROTIA persica 'Felicie' 
A selected form of this wonderful tree for autumn colour.

Parrotia persica Lamplighter

PARROTIA persica 'Lamplighter'
Previously listed simply as Parrotia persica 'Variegata', I am pleased to correctly name it, since it is something special, not surprisingly courtesy of the late Stephen Taffler! The leaves are broadly and irregularly margined cream, pale green and dark green in the centre. The variegation can diminish when the plant is growing very strongly, but this is rarely a problem in the garden. The autumn colour is flushed with purple, continuing the variegation. A real Wow plant but I do warn you that it is difficult to establish. It has a lack of vigour due to its low amount of chlorophyll (because it is highly variegated). As it gradually gets bigger, so its ability to grow increases. It does therefore need careful planting to get it going. A shady site is vital, but avoid over watering.

PARROTIA persica 'Jodrell Bank'  
An excellent selection to add to our collection, originally raised at the Jodrell Bank Arboretum next to the radio telescope of the same name near Manchester. This less widely grown cultivar forms a small erect tree and has superb autumn colour.


PARROTIA persica 'Pendula'   
In despair at the reliability of this desirable plant, we now graft them with a known pendulous form. However, the grafting will give it extra vigour, and may disguise the weeping habit at first. Support it initially until it reaches the desired height, then leave it to cascade! Magnificent autumn colours.


PARROTIA persica 'Vanessa'
This form was selected for its more upright habit, but still with the same gorgeous autumn colours.

NEW

PARROTIA subaequalis

NEW PARROTIOPSIS jacquemontiana 
Although related to Hamamelis and Parrotia, the flowers of this handsome large shrub are more akin to those of Cornus florida, being actually large white bracts around a cluster of small yellow flowers. They are produced mainly in April-May but sporadically later in the summer. Good yellow autumn colours.

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